• Improving the Health of All Texans

    • Help Your Patients Prevent Zika Virus Transmission

      To help prevent the spread of Zika virus in Texas, the DSHS has developed flyers and door hangers (available in English and Spanish) you can use in your office to educate your patients on protecting themselves from the disease. DSHS is testing for Zika virus at its public health lab in Austin. The CDC encourages Texas physicians to report suspected Zika virus cases to DSHS. 
  • Standing up for Public Health

    • Physicians Offer Help to State in Care of Refugees
      Texas can be confident in the effectiveness and management of the state’s refugee resettlement activities. Our state refugee program has been a federal/state and public/private partnership that works. In dozens of Texas communities, private, non-profit organizations work with HHSC to coordinate support for our newest Texas residents until they are able to support themselves. The minimal funding which assists with these services, most especially in the area of health care case management, should not be cut.
    • Wins
      TMA Wins Big for You in 2015 Legislative Session - In a 2015 legislative session marked by new state leadership, new money, and big shifts in how Texas' major health care agencies oversee care delivery, the House of Medicine remained as steady as ever in its mission to ensure physicians can give their patients the best care possible. That resolve paid off in significant victories that largely build on the Texas Medical Association's 2013 legislative successes.
    • DSHS: Expect Delay in Newborn Screening CF Tests
      As of April 1, the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) laboratory has temporarily ceased reporting abnormal results of the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Mutation Panel based on in-house testing. DSHS informed TMA and those who conduct newborn screening that the Texas newborn screening (NBS) laboratory received notification that some reagents used to identify mutations as part of the CF newborn screen have been recalled by the manufacturer due to potential false-positive results.
    • Changes to New State Notifiable Conditions List
      The Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) has released the 2016 Texas Notifiable Conditions list, which features some changes, including expanded descriptions of tuberculosis (TB) and TB infection to clarify reporting expectations.
    • Supreme Court Backs TMA in Tobacco Tax Case
      The Texas Supreme Court unanimously rejected a challenge to a tax lawmakers enacted in 2013 to recover health care costs from the tobacco companies that were not part of the $10 billion-a-year 1998 lawsuit settlement between the state and the nation's five largest tobacco manufacturers. The settlement funds and the tax both were intended to recover the health care costs associated with smoking. TMA had urged the high court to take the case.
    • Invest in Child Public Health and Prevention
      Investing in our children’s public health should not be one of those areas the Texas Legislature shortchanges. Properly funding the recruitment and retention of quality physical education teachers, chronic disease awareness, and rigorous school nutrition standards will develop a strong work force that Texas is so aggressively trying to recruit and retain.
    • TMA's Advocacy Priorities
      Healthy Vision 2020. That's TMA's strategic roadmap for TMA's state and federal advocacy initiatives for the remainder of the decade. It covers our work for physicians and patients in the Texas Legislature, U.S. Congress, and state and federal agencies. If you don’t know where you’re going, the old saying goes, you don’t need a map. Any road will take you there. But if you have a crystal clear vision of your destination, you need an equally detailed roadmap.
    • CDC: Health Facilities No Longer Need to Screen for Ebola
      The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released updated guidance — in the form of frequently asked questions — on Ebola screening in health care facilities. CDC says U.S. health facilities "no longer need to screen patients specifically for Ebola virus disease" but should regularly review CDC travel notices, obtain a complete travel history before the patient exam, and "adjust screening practices for acutely ill patients."
    • Help Your Patients Prevent Zika Virus Transmission
      To help prevent the spread of Zika virus in Texas, the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) has developed flyers and door hangers (available in English and Spanish) you can use in your office to educate your patients on protecting themselves from the disease. DSHS is testing for Zika virus at its public health lab in Austin. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention encourages Texas physicians to report suspected Zika virus cases to DSHS.
  • Addressing Pollution from Legacy Coal Power Plants in Texas

    This June 2013 report examines retrofitting Big Brown, Martin Lake, and Monticello coal-fired facilities with modern emission controls or retiring the plants and replacing them with cleaner alternative energy sources. Prepared by Daniel Cohan, PhD, assistant professor of environmental engineering at Rice University, Addressing Pollution targets these three 1970s-era legacy coal-fired power plants because they are "the leading emitters of air pollutants and greenhouse gases in Texas." And they heavily contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone and particulate matter, a mixture of substances including carbon-based particles, dust, and acid aerosols formed in the atmosphere by volatile organic compounds, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides.

    The report explores four options that "could foster the ability of electricity providers to offset any loss of generating capacity from the legacy coal-fired power plants, while enhancing air quality and minimizing costs to ratepayers."

  • Texas Public Health Stats

    • Immunizations

      There is a greater risk of outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases in communities with low immunization rates. Vaccine preventable diseases will increase if Texas cuts immunization funding.
    • Obesity

      "F as in 'Fat'" Ranks Texas the 13th most-obese state in the country. Healthy eating starts in childhood.
    • Smoking

      Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the state. More than 24,000 Texans die each year from tobacco-related illnesses. Join with TMA to make Texas smoke-free.
    • Mental Health Funding

      More than 4.3 million Texans, including 1.2 million children, live with some form of mental health disorder. Of these, 1.5 million cannot function at work, school, or in the community due to their illness.