• Improving the Health of All Texans

    • Texas Obesity Rate Grows to 30 Percent of Adults

      Although Texas in 2014 improved its overall health ranking among U.S. states from 36th to 31st, according to the United Health Foundation's annual report, the percentage of obese adult Texans — those who have a body mass index of 30 or higher — grew to 30.9 percent.
  • Standing up for Public Health

    • Establish the Texas Health Improvement Network
      TMA has addressed the Texas Legislature many times about the fragmented and under-resourced public health system in Texas. We will be unable to sustain our vibrant economy and population if so many of our patients not only are getting sick with preventable conditions, but also are getting sick earlier and are sicker for longer periods. These are persons who cannot contribute to Texas as they would like — and our economy needs them. A planned, measured strategy as is proposed by THIN will enable us to help our patients — our population — to begin to “bend the curve” in the use of our state resources for “sick care.”
    • Invest in Texas’ Public Health Infrastructure
      Physicians have long understood that we must continue to invest in our state’s public health infrastructure to address costly health concerns and to prevent paying an even higher price tag in the future. Texas’ exploding population in our large and mobile state means we need to ensure that we not only maintain our current public health system, but also continue to seek improvements and enhancements to address the problems raised as our state and population continue to grow.
    • Medicine's Bills Pick Up Speed
      With roughly six weeks to go in the Texas Legislature, lawmakers near the finish line in drafting a state budget for the next two years with significant improvements over last session that march the house of medicine closer to accomplishing its goals. With House and Senate committees in full swing as well, TMA is tracking a plethora of bills on the move that could help or hurt medicine's agenda.
    • DSHS, CDC Issue Listeria Testing, Medical Guidance
      The recent Listeria outbreak linked to Blue Bell Ice Cream prompted the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) to issue a health advisory that recommends testing patients who have fever and other symptoms consistent with listeriosis, are at increased risk of invasive listeriosis, and may have been exposed to Listeria through a potentially contaminated product.
    • Protect Schoolchildren from Life-Threatening Allergic Reactions
      This bill also would make sure school personnel are trained properly to recognize the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis. We believe this would support the many students in Texas who already have a diagnosis and carry their own auto-injectors. Seconds matter. Anaphylaxis can be fatal, and epinephrine immediately is the treatment of choice.
    • Texas Obesity Rate Grows to 30 Percent of Adults
      Although Texas in 2014 improved its overall health ranking among U.S. states from 36th to 31st, according to the United Health Foundation's annual report, the percentage of obese adult Texans — those who have a body mass index of 30 or higher — grew to 30.9 percent.
    • Use Current State Pamphlet to Inform About Child Hot Car Dangers
      Texas physicians appreciate Representative Johnson’s interest in protecting Texas children from the tragic and deadly outcomes related to leaving a child alone in a hot car. Representative Johnson’s House Bill 2574 highlights an important issue. However, the bill’s language establishes an education requirement as potentially a separate process from the existing parent education efforts already underway.
    • Letter: Regulate E-cigarettes Like Tobacco Products
      We appreciate the efforts of SB 1618 to regulate nicotine products, but we believe this definition of e-cigarettes is too narrow and does not encompass the entire range of products currently available on the market. While it is important to prohibit the use of nicotine products by children because of nicotine’s inherent toxicity and ease of addiction in the child population, other e-cigarette products pose significant danger to minors.
  • Addressing Pollution from Legacy Coal Power Plants in Texas

    This June 2013 report examines retrofitting Big Brown, Martin Lake, and Monticello coal-fired facilities with modern emission controls or retiring the plants and replacing them with cleaner alternative energy sources. Prepared by Daniel Cohan, PhD, assistant professor of environmental engineering at Rice University, Addressing Pollution targets these three 1970s-era legacy coal-fired power plants because they are "the leading emitters of air pollutants and greenhouse gases in Texas." And they heavily contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone and particulate matter, a mixture of substances including carbon-based particles, dust, and acid aerosols formed in the atmosphere by volatile organic compounds, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides.

    The report explores four options that "could foster the ability of electricity providers to offset any loss of generating capacity from the legacy coal-fired power plants, while enhancing air quality and minimizing costs to ratepayers."

  • Texas Public Health Stats

    • Immunizations

      There is a greater risk of outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases in communities with low immunization rates. Vaccine preventable diseases will increase if Texas cuts immunization funding.
    • Obesity

      "F as in 'Fat'" Ranks Texas the 13th most-obese state in the country. Healthy eating starts in childhood.
    • Smoking

      Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the state. More than 24,000 Texans die each year from tobacco-related illnesses. Join with TMA to make Texas smoke-free.
    • Mental Health Funding

      More than 4.3 million Texans, including 1.2 million children, live with some form of mental health disorder. Of these, 1.5 million cannot function at work, school, or in the community due to their illness.