Texas Vaccine Registry to be Accessible Through EHRs
By Sean Price

Telementoring_Survey

Texas physicians soon will have an easier time accessing and submitting vaccination records when using the Texas Immunization Registry (ImmTrac2), according to the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS), which runs the registry.

Starting Jan. 1, 2021, physician offices, hospitals, pharmacies, and other entities that vaccinate people will be able to check vaccine information and submit records in real time through their electronic health records (EHRs), DSHS announced Friday. 

Currently, physicians and others who vaccinate must send patient information via encrypted files to DSHS. They also can access ImmTrac2 records via the DSHS website, but not through EHRs.

In preparation for the Jan. 1 change, ImmTrac2 is accepting requests to begin the two-way data exchange from all authorized entities with certified electronic health record technology (CEHRT).

Find more information on the DSHS website or via email.

ImmTrac2 is designed to improve vaccination rates by helping people keep their vaccine records in order for life. Texas residents who sign up can have their children’s immunization records stored for free, allowing physicians, schools, and others who need to know which shots they have and which they don’t. People 18 and older must fill out an ImmTrac2 consent form or their records will be deleted by their 26th birthday.

Last Updated On

June 26, 2020

Related Content

EHRs | Immunization

Sean Price

Reporter

(512) 370-1392

Sean Price is a reporter for Texas Medicine and Texas Medicine Today. He grew up in Fort Worth and graduated from the University of Texas at Austin. He's worked as an award-winning writer and editor for a variety of national magazine, book, and website publishers in New York and Washington. He's also helped produce Texas-based marketing campaigns designed to promote public health. Sean lives in Austin and enjoys hiking, photography, and spending time with his wife and two sons.

More stories by Sean Price