Problem-Based Learning in a Managed Care Seminar for All New Residents at an Academic Medical Center

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Abstract of Journal Article -- February 2003

By Amr E. Abouleish, MD, MBA; Alma Golden, MD; Alice Anne O'Donell, MD; Patricia S. Beach, MD; Kirk A. Calhoun, MD; Thomas A. Blackwell, MD; Patricia J. Gallaway, RN; Lenore Teske, MS, RN; Suzanne M. Wilson, RN; Esther M. Koleng; and Alvin L. LeBlanc, MD

One of the most important challenges in resident education is to train residents how to function in relation to managed care companies and systems so as to enhance the quality, accessibility, and efficiency of health care.

Since 1996, The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston has presented an annual half-day seminar on managed care to new residents. The format involves training sessions and didactic presentations aimed at small groups (led by faculty physicians and nonphysicians from throughout the medical and managed care establishments). Problem-based learning sessions conducted in these groups focus on topics such as the organization of managed care systems, access, network, admit versus observation, inpatient status, denials, avoidable hospital days, concurrent reviews, gatekeepers, referrals, behavioral health, disease management programs, and financial considerations. Pretests and posttests are given to those participating to gauge the effectiveness of the program. In addition, participants complete evaluation forms that can be used by program coordinators to assess resident satisfaction with the learning format and to determine what improvements can be made in the process.

For the 1999 and 2000 seminars, posttest results were significantly higher than pretest results for the new residents who participated in the seminar. Each year, seminar evaluations show that the small-group format is well received.

We conclude that the small-group learning format is effective and enjoyable for the residents and their leaders. The format necessitates the training of 30 group leaders to increase their knowledge of managed care systems.

February 2003 Texas Medicine Contents
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