Tobacco Use Prevention and Cessation

    Tobacco Use: Children and Adolescents

    Across the U.S., more than 3 million children and adolescents are smoking cigarettes. (1) Use of smokeless tobacco is estimated at 10% among high school students. (2) An estimated 39% of households with one or more children aged 6 or younger contain at least one smoker.

    Cigarettes, spit tobacco and environmental tobacco smoke are hazardous to the health of children and adolescents. Young, active smokers have increased prevalence and severity of respiratory symptoms and illnesses and decreased physical fitness. Spit tobacco users have increased risk of oral cancer and leukoplakia. Children exposed to tobacco smoke have higher rates of lower respiratory tract infections, chronic middle ear infections, pneumonia, and lung cancer. (2) Passive smoke exacerbates asthma and allergy symptoms and decreases pulmonary function and rate of lung growth.

    Sources
    (1) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1995
    (2) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1994

    Tobacco Cessation: Children & Adolescents

    Please note: Resource links provided here do not imply endorsement by Texas Medical Association.

    Recommendations of Major Authorities
    Children/Adolescents
    Tobacco

    American Academy of Pediatrics
    Clinicians should obtain a history of environmental
    tobacco smoke exposure when encountering a child
    with a respiratory illness, and should inform both
    patients and parents about the hazards of tobacco use.
    American Medical Association
    Adolescents should receive annual screening and
    health guidance to promote avoidance of tobacco
    use. A cessation plan should be provided for
    adolescents who use tobacco products.
    National Cancer Institute
    1. Anticipate the risk for tobacco use at each
    developmental stage.
    2. Ask about exposure to tobacco smoke and tobacco use at each visit.
    3. Advise all smoking parents to stop and all children not to use tobacco products.
    4. Assist children in resisting tobacco use; assist
    tobacco users in quitting.
    5. Arrange follow-up visits as required.
    United States Preventive Services Task Force
    Tobacco cessation counseling on a regular basis for
    all persons who use tobacco products. Pregnant
    women and parents with children living at home
    should be counseled on the potentially harmful effects of smoking on fetal and child health. Anti-tobacco messages should be included in health promotion counseling of children, adolescents, and young adults.
    All Major Authorities
    Primary care clinicians should counsel both parents
    and children about the importance of avoiding
    initiation of tobacco use and of stopping tobacco use after initiation.

    Clinical Guidelines
    Children/Adolescents
    Tobacco

    Clinician's Handbook of Preventive Services
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1994

    • Select "PPIP"
    • Select Children/Adolescents: Counseling  from Table of Contents
    • Chapter 23: Tobacco  (Basics of Tobacco Counseling)

    Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
    Clinical Guideline #18: Smoking Cessation

    • Select "Guidelines and Medical Outcomes"
    • Click on "Clinical Practice Guidelines Online"

    Links for   Texans
    Children/Adolescents
    Tobacco

    National Cancer Institute

    • Click on "International Cancer Information Center"
    • Select "Patients and the Public"

    American Cancer Society

    • Click on "Cancer Information"
    • Scroll down to "Patient/Family Information"

    American Heart Association

    • Click on "Home, Health & Family"
    • Select "Kids Only"

    American Lung Association

    • Click on "Learn About"
    • Select "Smoking and Tobacco Control"

    Healthfinder

    • Click on "Search"
    • Select "Smoking

    Links for Texas   Physicians
    Children/Adolescents
    Tobacco

    U.S. Preventive Services Task Force   Clinician's Handbook of Preventive Services
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1994

    • Select "PPIP"
    • Select Children/Adolescents: Counseling  from Table of Contents
    • Chapter 23: Tobacco  (Family & Provider Resources)

    Texas Tobacco Resource Catalog
    Complete listing of materials available in Texas.

    National Cancer Institute

    • Click on "International Cancer Information Center"
    • Select "Health Professionals"

    American Cancer Society

    • Click on "Cancer Information"
    • Scroll down to "Electronic Publications for Health Professionals"

    American Heart Association

    • Click on "Healthcare Professionals"

    Docs Ought to Care
    Posters, T-shirts, bumper stickers, and other items available for a nominal charge.  (713) 528-1487

    Medical Matrix
    Peer-reviewed, annotated, updated clinical medicine resources.

    Tobacco   Use: Adults

    Chances are ... you see patients who use tobacco in your practice.

    (1) In Texas, 23.2% of adults 18 and over are current smokers.

    Chances are ... you CAN do something about your patients' tobacco use.

    A physician's advice to quit is a powerful motivator for attempting to stop.

    Tobacco is a potent human carcinogen. A majority of cancers of the lung, trachea, bronchus, larynx, pharynx, oral cavity, and esophagus can be attributed to the use of smoked or spit tobacco. Smoking promotes atherosclerosis and is a significant risk factor for myocardial infarction and cardiovascular, coronary and peripheral artery disease. It is a risk factor for respiratory illnesses such as COPD and pneumonia and increases the risk of osteoporosis. Smoking during pregnancy can cause perinatal death, low birth weight, preterm delivery, can increase the risk of miscarriage, and can result in fetal growth retardation. (2) An association has also been made between smoking and an increased risk of SIDS.

    Sources
    1. Centers for Disease Control, 1996
    2. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, 1996

    Tobacco Cessation: Adults

    Please note: Resource links provided here do not imply endorsement by Texas Medical Association.

    Recommendations of Major   Authorities
    Adults
    Tobacco

    All Major Authorities Physicians should provide smoking cessation counseling, treatment, and referral to patients who smoke.

    Clinical   Guidelines
    Adults
    Tobacco

    U.S. Preventive Services Task Force
    Guide to Clinical Preventive Services, Second Edition , 1996

    • Select "TEXT"
    • Click on "Counseling to Prevent Tobacco Use"
    • Scroll to "Clinical Intervention"

    Clinician's Handbook of Preventive Services
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1994

    • Select "PPIP"
    • Select Adults: Counseling  from Table of Contents
    • Chapter 59: Tobacco  (Basics of Tobacco Counseling)

    Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
    Clinical Guideline #18: Smoking Cessation

    • Select "Guidelines and Medical Outcomes"
    • Click on "Clinical Practice Guidelines Online"

    How to Help Your Patients Stop Smoking
    TMA Physician Oncology Education Program

      Links for Texans
    Adults
    Tobacco

    National Cancer Institute

    • Click on "International Cancer Information Center"
    • Select "Patients and the Public"

    American Cancer Society

    • Click on "Cancer Information"
    • Scroll down to "Patient/Family Information"

    American Heart Association

    • Select "Home, Health & Family"
    • Select "Patient Information"

    American Lung Association

    • Click on "Learn About"
    • Select "Smoking and Tobacco Control"

    Healthfinder

    • Click on "Search"
    • Select "Smoking

    Links for   Texas Physicians
    Adults
    Tobacco

    U.S. Preventive Services Task Force
    Clinician's Handbook of Preventive Services
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1994

    • Select "PPIP"
    • Select Adults: Counseling  from Table of Contents
    • Chapter 59: Tobacco  (Family & Provider Resources)

    Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
    Consumer's Guide #18: Smoking Cessation  (English & Spanish)

    • Select "Guidelines and Medical Outcomes"
    • Click on "Clinical Practice Guidelines Online"

    Texas Tobacco Resource Catalog Complete listing of materials available in Texas.

    National Cancer Institute

    • Click on "International Cancer Information Center"
    • Select "Health Professionals"

    American Cancer Society

    • Click on "Cancer Information"
    • Scroll down to "Electronic Publications for Health Professionals"

    American Heart Association

    • Click on "Healthcare Professionals"

    Medical Matrix
    Peer-reviewed, annotated, updated clinical medicine resources.

    Tobacco     Data and Statistics

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    • Select "Data and Statistics"
    • Search "Tobacco"

    Texas Department of Health

    • Select "Search Our Site"
    • Search "Tobacco"

    Texas Cancer Data Center

    Return to Tobacco Resources


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