Austin Physician Elected TMA’s 146th President

For Immediate Release
May 14, 2011

 

 

     

Contact: Pam Udall
phone: (512) 370-1382
cell: (512) 413-6807

Pam Udall

 

Contact: Brent Annear
phone: (512) 370-1381
cell: (512) 656-7320

Brent Annear

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HOUSTON - The Texas Medical Association (TMA) elected C. Bruce Malone, MD, of Austin, its 146th president. TMA’s House of Delegates, the association’s policymaking body, elected Dr. Malone leader of the nation’s largest state medical society during its annual meeting this week in Houston.

“This honor carries with it a strong responsibility to the patients of Texas,” Dr. Malone said. “We are preparing for huge changes in the way health care is delivered, while trying to maintain the excellence in science, technology, and innovation that has been the hallmark of U.S. medicine.” 

Adapting to health system reform will be an important focus during Dr. Malone’s one-year term as TMA president. Regardless of the effects of the Affordable Care Act, he hopes to maintain innovation in medicine, reduce costs, and preserve the doctor-patient relationship. “If we lose the ability of the patient to interact with the doctor and to decide what’s best for that patient’s care one-on-one without interference by corporations or bureaucracy, we’ve lost the heart of American medicine,” he says. He sees TMA as an advocate for physicians, organized medicine, and “the 27 million people who live in Texas as patients.”

Patients motivate the orthopedic surgeon even in the face of uncertainty over medicine’s future. “[Even] with all of this change, we’re still really fortunate to be doctors, fortunate to have patients share part of their lives,” says Dr. Malone. He believes that is what is unique about being a physician.

Dr. Malone previously served on the TMA Board of Trustees for nine years, including a two-year stint as chair and a one-year term as secretary. He has served on numerous TMA advisory boards including the Budget Committee and Board of Ethics, and as chair of the Physician Services Advisory Committee.

In addition to his leadership roles within TMA, he has been the chief of orthopedics, president of the medical staff, and member of the Board of Governors of St. David’s Health Care Partnership. He served as president of the Travis County Medical Society and as a Texas delegate to the American Medical Association, and is currently a TMA delegate representing Travis County. He is on the board of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas and is a past president of the TMF Health Quality Institute.   

Dr. Malone became inspired to choose a career in medicine by an uncle who was an internist and pulmonologist in West Virginia. Dr. Malone earned his medical degree from the Duke University School of Medicine, then completed his internship and residency in orthopedic surgery at Case Western Reserve University Hospitals in Cleveland. He later served as a major in the U.S. Air Force Medical Corps in Washington.   

Orthopedics attracted Dr. Malone early on. “I’m one of those guys who likes to identify the problem, solve the problem, and go on,” he says. He is proud of the medical advances that improve patients’ outcomes. “I have patients tell me almost every month that they’re so happy with what’s happened to them after their joint replacement, saying, ‘It must be really wonderful to be able to do this and help people.’” It is, he acknowledges.  

Dr. Malone has been practicing medicine for 37 years, and is a board-certified orthopedic surgeon at Austin Bone & Joint Clinic, where he’s practiced since 1977. His special interests are in major joint reconstruction and trauma.

He and his wife, Libby, have three children and two grandchildren.

TMA is the largest state medical society in the nation, representing more than 45,000 physician and medical student members. It is located in Austin and has 120 component county medical societies around the state. TMA’s key objective since 1853 is to improve the health of all Texans.

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